What do "human-grade" ingredients really mean and why are they important in your dog's food?

September 22, 2020
Our motto is: We treat your dog like our family! And, if we wouldn't eat it ourselves, we don't put it in our treats! This is why we're passionate about baking our treat recipes with only 100% human-grade ingredients. But, what's the true meaning behind "human-grade"?

The AAFCO (Association of American Feed Control Officials) guideline for human-grade states:
“In the AAFCO-defined feed term “human grade” the use of the term “human grade” is only acceptable in reference to the product as a whole. The deed term specifies that every ingredient and the resulting product must be stored, handled, processed, and transported in a manner that is consistent and compliant with regulations for current good manufacturing practices (cGMP’s) for human edible foods as specified in 21 CFR part 117.”

So, to be classified as human-grade, all ingredients must be edible for humans and prepared in a human-grade certified kitchen, and human-grade is more intensely inspected than feed grade.

As stated by the FDA, feed grade food can include “pet food consisting of material from diseased animals or animals which have died otherwise than by slaughter, goes through a kill step, such as heat processing, which is designed to kill harmful bacteria.”

So, although safe for animal consumption, like we said before, “if we wouldn’t eat it ourselves, we don’t put it in our treats!”

The distinction between human grade and feed grade is so important because, with a human-grade promise, you can feel confident that you’re providing your dog with superior nourishment, without needing to make your pup’s food yourself. There’s no more tedious label “guess-work” when you choose human-grade quality. Then, you can spend more time on things you really enjoy - like hanging out with your furry best friend!



References:

https://www.agriculture.nh.gov/publications-forms/documents/aafco-human-grade-pet-products-standards.pdf
https://truthaboutpetfood.com/fda-admits-some-pet-food-sourced-from-diseased-animals/